Go Hydro

Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture, the method of growing plants without soil, using mineral nutrient solutions in a water solvent. Terrestrial plants may be grown with only them roots exposed to the mineral solution, or the roots may be supported by an inert medium, such as perlite or gravel. The nutrients in hydroponics can come from an array of different sources; these can include but are not limited to byproduct from fish waste, duck manure, or commercial fertilisers.

How do we Grow Hydroponic Cannabis? In the previous post, we gave an overview of hydroponic gardening including its origins, the various systems and techniques, and medium options for a hydroponic grow. In this next article, we will focus how to use hydroponic systems specifically for growing cannabis. Hydroponics is growing cannabis by using any growing medium other than soil. These alternatives (which are often combined) include gravel, coco coir, sand, mister air, vermiculite, peat moss, perlite, hydro ton, and/or just water. During the entire process you must provide the plant with all its nutrients by way of its water supply. Cannabis growers have been using different hydroponic methods for many years as a way to maximize yields and speed up growth, the two main advantages of soilless growing.

Hydroponic systems come in different forms. Here are the top five most common forms. One is Aeroponics. Aeroponics uses a grow chamber to suspend roots in the air with no medium inside of a closed-loop system. Water, rich with nutrients, douses the bases of these plants as they hang in the air. By providing an oxygen-rich environment, the microbes on the plant are able to digest and process the nutrients for its circulatory system. Another is Deep Water Culture Deep Water Culture is a method of growing which uses a bucket of nutrients, also called bubblers. The plants are suspended over the nutrients as the roots grow into the nutrients below. The bubblers’ mixture is filled with air using an aquarium pump and pays off by speeding up the grow time. The oxygen and fertilizer enriched mixture work wonders for the end product. Next is Drip Irrigation The drip irrigation system feeds each plant individually in its own chamber. Nutrients are administered by a dripper, and then the solution is recycled, much like the already mentioned methods. Each plant is located in separate chambers where the nutrients are fed to the medium by means of a small dripper. The Nutrient Film Technique. The Nutrient Film Technique is a hydroponic method which involves a nutrient solution being pumped onto a tray or gulley to form a shallow and slow-moving film that moves through the plant’s roots. These roots grow into the solution, creating a large root mat in the tray. Having round the clock access to water and nutrients along with more than enough oxygen for the roots, makes for rapid development with maximum yields. And lastly Ebb-And-Flow Ebb and Flow replaces soil with a medium like rockwool to produce very large yields. This type of system stimulates a natural cycle of rain and the time in between it, therefore giving off a more natural environment for your grow.

What makes hydroponic nutrients “good” or “bad?” When it comes to choosing hydroponic nutrients for growing weed, there are a few considerations that are really important. The Best Hydroponic Nutrients are Made specifically for hydroponics, no organic matter, Mineral nutrients are “chelated”, it contains rich sources of micro-nutrients and should be optimum NPK ratios. In the other hand Worst Hydroponic Nutrients are made specifically for soil, it contains a lot of organic matter, this stuff can completely mess up your reservoir and cause unexpected and unwanted bacteria/root problems. If it seems cloudy with lots of material floating in the water, don’t use it for hydro.

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